Move to Volunteer

Hunter VolunteerAs we wrap up the sermon series on what it looks like to be a follower of Jesus I have been thinking about the call to be Moving. The call to use our time, talent and treasure to serve people. This call may seem daunting if you are new to Restoration and just want to find your place in a community that appears to be in constant motion. A community that appears knit together and you are unsure about where your onramp starts.

You may be surprised to read that I have been waiting for you! There is a place for you to start your journey of being known. A place where we are yearning for you to step into the opportunity of serving with your time and talent. A place to step into our life together on Sundays.

Stricklands Volunteer Greeter

On the average Sunday, we have about 420 adults attend services. Did you know that we need about 80 volunteers each Sunday? That is 20% of our adult congregation EVERY Sunday. Multiply that by 4 to 5 Sundays a month and there is an opportunity for each and every one of us to participate in Sunday liturgy. An opportunity for each and every one of us to take a deeper dive in our discipleship by moving to serve. An opportunity to practice living out our statement, “I have a relationship with God that is important to me.”

You may be wondering what Sunday Liturgical Servants look like. They are the greeters that meet you on the sidewalk, the ushers that hand you a worship guide, the people behind the scenes that set out the wine and water and keep the pews supplied with green cards. The people that pray and the people that keep the power point on point. There is a place for everyone. It’s easy.

For those that already volunteer on Sundays, Thank you! Your service has created a space for others to worship and pursue Jesus with our community. We are so thankful for your willingness to serve on Sundays.

So, whether you have been attending for years or just arrived last week, please contact me. I really want to meet you!

Have a good week,

Kathy Kenyon (kathy@restorationarlington.org)

Fall Retreat 2018

Twenty years ago this fall, I first learned the value of retreats. There is no place better than a retreat for quickly building strong relationships.

As a first-year student at UVA, I was trying to find connections to Christian community. I went a few times to a fellowship group called FCA.  Everyone was friendly enough, but each week, I would slip out of the large group meeting not knowing many people.

A few weeks into the school year, they started advertising the Fall Retreat. “Come to the retreat! You won’t regret it,” was the refrain from many upperclassmen.

No way, I thought. I barely know anyone. Why would I want to repeat the same uncomfortable experience over an entire weekend? I didn’t sign up.

On the Friday of the retreat weekend, I went out with friends and returned to my dorm room at 2 am to an enthusiastic voicemail from an older FCA student named Brad, who is one of my best friends to this day: “Daniel, you’re coming on this retreat! Tomorrow at 9, a girl named Katye is going to be outside your dorm to pick you up – get yourself up, you’re coming!”

Feeling no choice, I dragged myself out of bed the next morning and hopped a ride with Katye up to Camp Varsity in rural Virginia.

The retreat speaker was a former student named Brian Broadway.  I don’t remember much about what he taught that weekend.  What I do remember is playing hours of ultimate frisbee – getting into a ridiculously fun food fight – playing guitars around campfires – feeling close to God amidst the beauty of nature. Most of all, I remember good conversations with people I found myself really liking – many of whom remain friends to this day.

To my surprise, going on the retreat drew me into FCA. It became a home for the rest of my college experience and was pivotal in fostering my community and spiritual growth at UVA. Looking back, I’m so glad that Brad dragged me up there.

There is no place better than a retreat for quickly building strong relationships.

Fast forward to our first year at Restoration. Campbell and I were just trying to keep our heads above water with a super demanding job and more demanding young kids. Life felt really hard. I knew a few people at Restoration but wasn’t sure if it was worth it to give up a whole weekend for the fall retreat.

As soon as we got up to Massanetta Springs, I was reminded of how much I love retreats. I loved watching our girls dancing to Matt and Clay playing bluegrass music. I was able to take a breath and appreciate God’s goodness amidst the crazy. I struck up conversations with people who have become good friends – conversations that just aren’t possible when you only have a few minutes after church, trying to prevent a little one from running into Quincy Street! That retreat solidified our connection to Restoration.

You may find yourself on the fence about coming on this retreat. Perhaps you’re reticent to spend a whole weekend with people you may not know very well. Or maybe you’re unsure of whether it’s worth it to give up a whole weekend away when life is crazy busy.

I promise not to send someone to pick you up without your consent. But I do feel confident repeating the same truthful refrain that I first heard 20 years ago:

Come to the retreat!!  You won’t regret it.

– Dan Vogel

SIGN UP for the Fall Retreat!

Rule of Life

On Tuesday, July 31 from 6:30-8:30pm in the sanctuary at Restoration, I’ll be leading a mini-workshop on how to create a personal rule of life.

A Rule of Life is a tool rooted in the monastic tradition and it used take inventory of all aspects of our life, to create intentional goals, and to measure our progress toward our God-given callings, goals, and responsibilities.

The idea started by a monk named Benedict to help create order and stability for the monks in his monastery. He wasn’t the first to try such a thing, but he was the first to create a rule of life that was actually livable. So despite it being strict, it was helpful because it led to flourishing and growth for those in his monasteries. And there are still Benedictine monks to this day living by his rule for life.

If you feel like your life is overwhelmingly busy. Or if you are in a season of questioning and discerning your calling, especially as it relates to work. Or if you feel like you are doing things you don’t want to do and never getting to the things you actually want to do. Or if you feel like you have been in a spiritual rut and not growing, it can be helpful to press pause, take stock of where you are going and what you are doing in order to see if it is taking you where God wants you to go. Creating a personal rule of life is a helpful tool to do that.

It is just a tool, and it certainly isn’t the only thing you can do. You can go for a walk, call a friend, pray, lift weights, take a deep breath, journal. But some of these things might be habits you want to regularly incorporate into your daily schedule and rhythms. A rule of life will help you find a place for them in your already packed schedule… 🙂

That’s the gist.

We’ll spend a bit of time talking about what a rule of life is and how to put one together for yourself.

I should note I learned about all of this from a good friend and mentor named Steve Macchia who wrote the book on creating a personal rule of life. I’ll be using it to structure our time together. Feel free to buy a copy for yourself if you want to go deeper. It is very well done!

I hope you will consider coming next Tuesday, July 31st. Bring a journal or notepad.

If you have questions or want to let me know you are coming, email me. Thanks!

– Scott

Summer Small Group Thursdays 7:30-9pm at Restoration Starting July 12

Some of us love what we do. Others are deeply dissatisfied. A lot of us get burnt out by our
work, and others find our jobs boring. Some experience both at the same time! And it seems
nearly all of us struggle to figure out how to manage the responsibilities and demands of our
work, our families, and our sanity.

Our assessment of our work performance is often one of the best gauges to assess our
emotions. Our work affects us. It is often our go-to when someone asks us how we are doing.

Friend 1: How are things going?

Friend 2: Good, work is going well. Our firm just brought on a new client. How are things with you?

Friend 1: I’m stressed. Work is insane right now.

You get the idea…

Starting July 8, we’ll begin a summer sermon series on work and why it matters. And though
small groups are taking a break for the summer, we’re offering one special 6-week small group
that will run concurrently with the sermon series.

The group will meet on Thursday evenings from 7:30-9pm at Restoration. Sign up.

We’ll follow the passages used in the prior sermon, and we’ll follow the book “Work Matters” by Tom Nelson. You certainly don’t need to read the book to participate (It’s summer after all!).

So whether you work full-time (as a parent and/or in an office!) or part-time, whether you are
looking for a job, or want to get rid of the one you got, and whether you’re a student, retired,
or something else, I hope you will consider joining us. Our vocations take a variety of forms, and we all have wisdom and experience to share. Plus there’s going to be snacks!

Additionally, if you are new to Restoration or just moved here this summer, please come! Small groups are one of the best ways to get connected here.

Work is hard. But it matters. To God. To us. And to each other.

Join us!

– Scott

Resto Summer BBQ

Summer is here! And that means it is time for the Restoration Summer BBQ!

Join us at Oak Grove Park* (1606 N Quincy St. – across from where we park on Sundays!) after the 5 pm service on Sunday, July 15!

If you are looking to have maximum fun this summer, this is the BBQ for you. It will have everything: hot dogs, burgers, veggie burgers, lemonade, ice tea, water, music, outdoor games, a playground, fun people like you… I could go on, but let me get to the important details:

Sign up your favorite dessert (if your last name is A-G) or favorite side (if your last name is H-Z)!

We would also love your help with set up, grilling, or clean up! Sign up here!

Everyone is welcome! Bring your friends (and maybe a lawn chair or a blanket)! Can’t wait to see you there!

*If it rains, we’ll meet in Fellowship Hall!

Oak Grove Park

Restoration Landscaping Day

Please join us this Saturday morning (6/23) from 8 am – 12 pm at Restoration as we weed, trim, mulch, and have fun making the church look beautiful!!

We’ll provide the tunes, the snacks and refreshments (including Duck Donuts… yum!), the mulch, and all the weeds you could want!

All you need to bring is yourself, and any of your favorite gardening tools and equipment. That list includes:

– gloves (we’ll have some but you may want to bring your own if you have them!)
– trowels
– garden rakes
– weeders
– small shovels
– wheelbarrows (would be extremely helpful!)

Also, don’t forget sunscreen and a hat! We’ll have lots of water!

Let Scott know if you are planning to come, so he can make sure there are enough snacks for everyone. See you Saturday morning!

Resto Weeds

Fall Retreat: Line Dancing, Wine Tasting, Lawn Games and More

Spots are filling up fast for this year’s annual fall retreat, but there is still time to make memories with us. Taking place in beautiful Massanetta Springs Camp and Conference Center in Harrisonburg, VA (about a 2.5 hour ride from the Washington, D.C. area), the retreat is a terrific opportunity to escape the Beltway for a few days to worship, pray and fellowship with our church family.

bonfire

Additionally, this year’s featured speaker will be Joe Ho of Focused Ministries who has prepared an important topic for us to discuss and think about titled: “The Problem of Race and The Power of The Cross.” Click here for more details.

wine

And if that wasn’t enough, the Fall Retreat will also feature a number of fun-filled activities including:

  • Lavender Farm (includes wine tasting)
  • Yoga
  • Farm visit
  • Bonfire
  • Soccer
  • Lawn Games
  • Boat making
  • Fishing
  • RestoArts

And last but not least…. Line Dancing!

What are you waiting for? Sign up now to secure your spot to join in on the fun!

Financial aid to cover a portion of the expenses is available through the registration form. Our kids (nursery – 5thgrade) will be in their kids’ small groups during the adult sessions. APEX (grades 6-12) will also be meeting during the adult sessions.

Restoration Fall Retreat: Let’s Make Memories Together

Fall is upon us and that means that the Restoration Anglican Church Fall Retreat is right around the corner. To those who have been there before, here’s your chance to do it all over again. And for those who have never been, here are just a handful of reasons why you should sign up – and make memories with us.

It’s Fun!

Located in picturesque Massanetta Springs Camp and Conference Center, there is no shortage of games and activities for you and your family. From traditional board games, to outdoor games including – basketball, soccer and football – chances are that any given time there is someone doing something fun at the conference center. Among the highlights include a chance to play soccer with a large group. All ages are welcomed to kick the soccer ball around.

It’s Beautiful!

Comfortably, but conveniently, removed from the hustle and bustle of the Washington, D.C. area, Harrisonburg is beautiful, especially during the fall. The resort provides many inviting trails for one to collect their thoughts and pray without the distractions of city life. The retreat is a great opportunity to enjoy God’s creation.

There’s a Bonfire!

Always a fan favorite, the bonfire is a chance for folks to gather around the fire roasting marsh mellows, singing hymns and enjoying one another’s company. Don’t be surprised if people linger around the fire long after the littlest ones turn in. Camp memories are incomplete without bonfires and at the Resto Fall retreat, we don’t disappoint.

Come For the Fun, Stay for the Guest Speaker

Year in, year out, the staff do a great job recruiting great speakers to join us at our retreat. The theme may differ from year to year, but the message is always convicting and powerful. For this year, our guest speaker is Joe Ho – the National Director of Asian American Ministries at InverVarsity Christian Fellowship. Joe is a gifted speaker who loves the Lord and is traveling from Austin, TX to join us for our church retreat.

What Are You Waiting For? Sign Up Now!

Stay tuned for more posts about the Fall Retreat and encourage others to sign up today.

Note: Our kids (nursery-5th grade) will be in their kids’ small groups during the adult sessions. APEX (grades 6-12) will also be meeting during the adult sessions.

Financial aid to cover all or a portion of the expenses is available upon request. Please contact a staff member for further details.

Wardens’ Report: March 2017

The Wardens’ Report: a brief summary of highlights from monthly Vestry meetings, designed to provide information about our growth, finances, priorities and progress towards our strategic plan.

The Vestry gathered on Tuesday for our March meeting.  As is our custom, we have dinner together and begin the meeting with prayer in the sanctuary.  Each month we spend time specifically praying for one staff member and this month Leigh McAfee guided us through prayer as we gave thanks for the work and contribution of Nathan Dickerson.  We appreciate the way Nathan shepherds small group leaders, thinks strategically about church planting, and pastors our congregation well.

As we begin our preparations and discussions for next year’s budget, treasurer Meredith Lloyd walked us through February’s monthly financial documents.  Our average Sunday attendance for the month of February was 574 and our year to date attendance is up 12% over FY2016.  While our giving was a bit under budget for the month, our year to date giving and our year to date spending are right on budget.  At the beginning of the fiscal year, we chose to delay spending on targeted non-essential items until after the first half of the year.  In our business meeting, we voted to release spending on those items.

As Restoration Immigration Legal Aid (RILA) begins to grow and serve more clients, they continue to look for ways to raise the necessary funding.  We discussed their proposal to apply for a grant through the Anglican communion and voted to allow them to use a specific fundraising platform.  We remain excited about the ways God is using Restoration to love, serve and connect with our neighbors.

Restoration continues to grow and our children’s ministry comprises almost 25% of our weekly attendance.  As we anticipate further growth and opportunities to reach beyond Quincy Street through church planting and RILA, we become aware of our limitations.  Part of our discussions at Vestry each month involve listening to where God is leading us and planning toward future needs.  We are thankful to have had the opportunity to meet with Bishop John Guernsey on Saturday.  He is encouraging of the work that Restoration is doing and we are grateful for his wisdom.  That conversation helped guide our discussion as we considered personnel and volunteer needs and as we think about sending out church planters in the coming years.

As always, if you have questions, concerns, words of wisdom or encouragement, please know that we are open to your feedback.

You can read an archive of past Wardens’ Reports on our website or Vestry Meeting minutes on CCB, under the ‘Files’ tab in the ‘Entire Church Group’

-Dietrich Kuhlmann and Hannah Royal, Wardens

Come to the Cross: An invitation and a story

Written by Steve Brooks

This is a personal invitation for you to come to the cross, both literally and spiritually. On Good Friday at 8:45 a.m. Restoration Anglican Church will do something new – we will have a “Procession of the Cross” from our house to the church. (See details below.) It is a one-mile journey that I have dreamed of for years and everyone is invited to participate.

Here is a little context and history as to what we are doing and why. Over the course of Restoration’s history, I have built five crosses for the church. Three of these crosses are currently used by Restoration full-time, one stands in my backyard (which we use on Good Friday) and the last one was retired a few years ago. I have a passion for making crosses. David and Matt have been very kind to let me apply my passion through cross making for our church.

CrossforGoodFriday

With that said, we need to get the Easter cross to church. And why not do this in a way that bestows the reverence the cross deserves and process with it in remembrance of how Jesus was forced to carry the cross on which he died so that our sins would be forgiven.

The procession will take about 45 minutes, and once we arrive at the church, we will lay the cross down in the sanctuary and everyone will be invited to nail your sins to the cross. There will be paper, pens, hammers and nails provided.

Prior to the service on Friday night the cross will be raised up with all the sins upon it and then at the end of the service the cross is removed in silence. On Saturday night, the cross is set up outside of the church and we remove the sins and burn them in the fire-pit before we enter for the Easter Vigil service. It is amazing.

So please – come to the cross.

I also invite you to come to another cross: the big one at the front of the sanctuary. Most people don’t make it past the communion rail, so please accept this invitation, too. This cross arrived last Easter and was a year behind schedule. When I first started building it for Easter 2015, a worktable collapsed and broke one of my knuckles. It took some time for my hand to heal before I could begin work again. It was a spiritual journey working on this cross, and I am grateful for how God worked through and in me in so many ways: That’s a whole other blog post.

As you come to the cross I invite you to touch it. The vertical section is made from 60-year-old Canadian red pine that came from a house renovation and the cross piece is a red oak beam that supported a tobacco barn in Richmond, Virginia that was built in 1910. Although they are different woods, the “red wood” was chosen specifically to represent the blood of Christ.

On both sides of the vertical section you will see 57 holes that have been filled with oak dowels – these filled holes represent our sins that have been forgiven. On the front of the vertical piece you will see two in-laid oak lines and one open cut that go from the top to the bottom of the cross. The oak in-lay comes from the original wooden cross that now hangs in the rafters at the back of the church. Have you noticed it? The in-lay represents the beauty of our forgiven sins, and the open cut in the middle represents the brokenness of humanity which will last until Christ returns and restores us fully.

The giant crack in the oak cross piece is faced forward for all to see as it represents the humanity of Christ and the brokenness he endured on Good Friday. When I saw it for the first time I knew it had to be the cross piece. Oak is one of the hardest woods and I find it amazing that it cracked as it did, what stress it must have been under. As I shaped this piece of wood I was reminded over and over again that God sent His only Son to live, be broken and die for our forgiveness.

I also invite you to come to another cross, the one that hangs in the rafters at the back of the church. This cross was hung in the sanctuary from 2010-2016 and moved last year. Although you can’t see the details of this cross (but check out the picture), it is a beautiful red oak beam from a Pennsylvania barn that was built in 1830. It is unique in so many ways with a history that is unknown. It hangs in the rafters as a representation that when we leave church every Sunday, we leave with the cross of Christ.

Finally, you are invited to visit the small processional cross that stands in the front right corner of the sanctuary – we used this cross at Restoration’s first service. It became the processional cross to lead the kids to their small groups and is now used at various times throughout the year. The red oak is from Home Depot, not much of a story there. The cross stand is made of leftover brick and Canadian red pine which were used to build our church.

Working with wood is more than a labor of love for me, it is a true blessing, especially in making a cross. While working, I play loud music, talk to God, pray and listen for His response. In these times of quiet I think about who I am, why I am here and I always ask God, “What do You want me to do next?” In these moments of “making,” I think about how God restores us in all things. His restoration goes beyond a few cuts here and there, some sanding, then oil and a final finish. His restoration brings us back to life. I can’t do that with an old barn beam, but He does it with us – it’s His promise.

My last invitation is for you to come to the cross and find Christ in a new way, find His restoration and know that no matter what, He loves you.

If you want to participate in the “Procession of the Cross” – send me an email and I will give you our address. brooks{at}potomacassociates.com.

Written by Steve Brooks

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