Holy Week 2019

 

 

HOLY WEEK SCHEDULE

Join us for a full week as we remember together.


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Palm Sunday

Sunday, April 14

We will begin outside with services at 9am, 11am, and 5pm.

Shuttle service provided.

 

Maundy Thursday

Thursday, April 18 @ 7:30pm

Shuttle service and nursery provided.

 

Walking the Cross

Friday, April 19 @ 8:30am

Gather at the Brooks’ house to walk the cross to church, praying the stations as you go.

 

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Stations of the Cross

Friday, April 19 @ 10am (for children and the young at heart), 12pm, and 2pm.

Come. Pray. There will also be a special art response for children @ 11am in the Fellowship Hall.

 

Good Friday

Friday, April 19 @ 7:30pm

Hear from people in our congregation about how their stories are weaving into God’s big story.

Shuttle service and nursery provided.

 

The Great Vigil of Easter29573259_10156493647911424_6204809434505296826_n

Saturday, April 20 @ 8:30pm

Come hear the whole big story of God’s rescue and redemption. Bring food to share for the Resurrection Party after the service.

Shuttle provided, but no nursery.

 

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Easter Sunday

Sunday, April 21 @ 9am, 11am, and 5 pm

Shuttle service and nursery provided, but kids preschool – 5th grade will remain with their families throughout the service.

Upcoming Weekend with Regent Professor Darrell Johnson (April 4-7)

Darrell-Johnson

We have an exciting opportunity that is coming in just a few weeks! Along with another local church (Church of the Ascension), we are hosting a weekend with Regent College (Vancouver) Professor Darrell Johnson. He will be here in Northern Virginia from Thursday, April 4 to Sunday, April 7.

Here a few great opportunities for you to engage with him:

  1. Public Speaking Seminar – Thursday, April 4, 7-9 PM

People say they fear public speaking even more than death… we’d like to make it easier than that! Please join us on Thursday, April 4 from 7-9 PM at Restoration to improve this important skill. We hope to develop persuasive communication skills, master the art of presentation, & learn what makes a compelling narrative. This is a great opportunity to invite friends, family, neighbors, and co-workers!

  1. Sermon on the Mount Retreat – Fri PM, April 5 – Sat AM, April 6

Join us for two days of intensive teaching as Darrell Johnson leads us through Jesus’ Sermon on the Mount.

When: Friday, April 5, 7pm- 9:30pm / Saturday, April 6, 9am- 12:30pm

Where: Cornerstone Evangelical Free Church in Annandale, VA (3901 Gallows Rd, Annandale, VA 22003)

Cost:A suggested donation of $10 to cover costs of the event including snacks and nursery can be paid at time of registration or on site at the event.

Interested in Registering? Here is the link

  1. Preaching at Restoration – Sunday, April 7 @ 9 & 11 AM

Finally, Darrell will be preaching during our morning services at Restoration on Sunday, April 7.

We hope you are able to join us for one of these events. Please email Nathan Dickerson at nathan@restorationarlington.org if you have any questions!

Thanks!

This is why we LOVE the 5pm at Restoration!

The 5pm service is special for many reasons (there are about 20 of them that I curated from people who attend the 5.  Keep reading…).

We would love for you to try it!  As you know, trying something takes a ‘few tries’.  So if you want to give it a go, would you consider trying it from March 10 until June 9?  That’s all of Lent + Easter to Pentecost.  And that’s a great ‘try’!

We think some of you will try it, love it, and find a meaningful new rhythm to your Sabbath.

Curious?  Here’s a bunch of reasons to tip you over the edge…

It’s come as you are—not only in dress (jeans!) but people come where they are in life—single/married, young/old, children/no children, and everyone fits in.

Everyone is glad to see you!  You are greeted each Sunday like a long-lost friend even if it’s just been a week or two since you last met.

It’s a great way to “end” the weekend and at the same time start the “new” week with a Kingdom mindset.

The 5pm snacks are better!  Not really(!) but we do have snacks- just like the other services. 

It’s not crowded—there is always room for one more person or one more family…even if you are running late.

It’s not “formal”—while we meet at church and do all the worship things, it’s a little more like hanging out with a group of friends to worship together and talk about Jesus and what He’s doing in our lives.

You can be yourself—whether it’s been a tough week (or a good week), whether you feel like laughing (or crying), whether you like to sing loudly and raise your hands in praise (or not), we do it all.

It has a relaxed feel—it’s a low-stress service with rhythms of grace woven into it; it’s more about being present than the program.

It’s more intimate—because it’s a smaller group, you can know and be known by others.

It feels like family—it’s like attending the rehearsal dinner compared to the formal wedding or the Easter Vigil compared to the Sunday Easter services.  It’s more about the people you are with (Jesus and the Resto family) and less about the public-facing ceremony.

Kids’ small groups @ the 5 have their own special flavor, too. The small groups are smaller and the age-range of kids within each small group is wider. It’s a sweet opportunity to have deeper conversations between and among kids and leaders. This dynamic begins to provide our kids with the opportunity to experience mentorship that both looks ahead to those who are older and looks behind to those who are younger, as they see themselves as whole participants in their own spiritual formation and influencers of others’. In other words, we have a blast!

I love that the smaller size of an intimate group allows me to have deeper conversations with one or two people vs. just trying to say a quick surface “hello” to 20 or more people.

As someone who has a tendency to want to rush around from one thing to another, the 5pm is a sweet time of truly slowing down… No rushing to clear out of the Church for the next service, or rushing out of Church to get to a Sunday afternoon activity.

I really do feel like Sunday night is the start of my week. When I attend the 5pm service, I have a smoother transition into my work week and I feel more resilient to the Monday morning anxieties that come with my weekly to-do list, because I have it really fresh in my mind that God has got it all under control.

I have time throughout the afternoon to build up an excited anticipation for what is going to come that evening at Church.

The timing lends well to lingering longer over snacks after service and/or going straight to dinner afterwards with Church friends to continue the conversation about the sermon, prayer, what’s going on in our lives, etc.

If I could paint a picture of the 5pm service, it would be one of Jesus hanging out with his buddies around the supper table, reclined in happy relaxation… Kicking His sandals off, putting His feet up on the table, and motioning with wide open, welcoming arms to gather close… He’s saying, “The invitation is open. Come in and rest. There is always room for you.”

OK, finally. Can I say it?  I’m going to say it.  I like sleeping in!  And I am thankful to God for my “no alarm clock” Sunday mornings. Please don’t judge 🙂

 

-A cheerful invitation to try the 5 from cheerful people who attend the 5!

Information about Oliver McNeil’s Funeral

Oliver's hands

It is with a heavy heart that I write to tell you of Oliver McNeil’s death on Wednesday, December 5.  He and his parents, Shannon and Matt, are loved by many in our church and on their behalf, I extend my deep thanks for all of the ways that you, their community, prayed for and served them over the last months while Oliver’s body was in decline.

Some of you may not have known Oliver.  He was 11 years old, a regular at the 11am service, a huge fan of the Washington Nationals, and he loved to have his shoulders squeezed when he came up for communion.  Here is a link to an old blog post that his mom, Shannon, wrote in 2011, several years before their daughter, Waverly, died (2015) and when Oliver was still quite young.  You may find Shannon’s blog helpful in getting to know a little about their story as a family.

A service of thanksgiving for his life will be held at McLean Bible Church (MBC), on the ground level of the Smith Center, on Saturday, December 15 at 11:00am.  MBC will have “funeral parking” signs to guide you as you turn onto the property from the stoplight on Rt 7.  There will be people greeting you as you enter.  You can find more detailed travel directions to MBC, here.

Everyone is invited to stay for a light lunch reception that will follow the funeral.  It is being provided by Oliver’s friends at Jill’s House.  In many ways Jill’s House became Oliver’s house too— a home away from home where he could enjoy life’s simple pleasures, have fun, and find rest in a context that cared for him.  Jill’s House, a 501(c)(3), offers respite to children with intellectual disabilities and their families in the Greater Washington, D.C. area.

Shannon and Matt have suggested that gifts to honor Oliver’s life be given to Jill’s House.  Please visit here, and include ‘Oliver McNeil’ in the comments section.  Or checks can be sent to:  Jill’s House, 9011 Leesburg Pike, Vienna, VA 22182.

If you have questions about the funeral, you can call the Restoration office.

The Apostle Paul wrote, “But we do not want you to be uninformed, brothers and sisters, about those who are asleep, that you may not grieve as others do who have no hope.  For since we believe that Jesus died and rose again, even so, through Jesus, God will bring with him those who have fallen asleep.”  1 Thessalonians 4: 13-14
We do grieve.

But our grief is tethered to hope.
It does not overcome us.  On December 15 we will gather together to both grieve and to remind ourselves of our hope.  Thanks be to God for both.

-David

Move to Volunteer

Hunter VolunteerAs we wrap up the sermon series on what it looks like to be a follower of Jesus I have been thinking about the call to be Moving. The call to use our time, talent and treasure to serve people. This call may seem daunting if you are new to Restoration and just want to find your place in a community that appears to be in constant motion. A community that appears knit together and you are unsure about where your onramp starts.

You may be surprised to read that I have been waiting for you! There is a place for you to start your journey of being known. A place where we are yearning for you to step into the opportunity of serving with your time and talent. A place to step into our life together on Sundays.

Stricklands Volunteer Greeter

On the average Sunday, we have about 420 adults attend services. Did you know that we need about 80 volunteers each Sunday? That is 20% of our adult congregation EVERY Sunday. Multiply that by 4 to 5 Sundays a month and there is an opportunity for each and every one of us to participate in Sunday liturgy. An opportunity for each and every one of us to take a deeper dive in our discipleship by moving to serve. An opportunity to practice living out our statement, “I have a relationship with God that is important to me.”

You may be wondering what Sunday Liturgical Servants look like. They are the greeters that meet you on the sidewalk, the ushers that hand you a worship guide, the people behind the scenes that set out the wine and water and keep the pews supplied with green cards. The people that pray and the people that keep the power point on point. There is a place for everyone. It’s easy.

For those that already volunteer on Sundays, Thank you! Your service has created a space for others to worship and pursue Jesus with our community. We are so thankful for your willingness to serve on Sundays.

So, whether you have been attending for years or just arrived last week, please contact me. I really want to meet you!

Have a good week,

Kathy Kenyon (kathy@restorationarlington.org)

Wisdom and Technology Seminar

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Seminar Speaker Line-up (November 2-3rd)

How does technology fit into our lives as Christ followers? In what ways can it bring us closer to God and into deeper community with others? And in what ways does it merit careful consideration and boundaried use? In our day to day lives, technology is all around us and so readily available; it is easy to engage it without much thought. We invite you to join us for an opportunity to pause and reflect on the intersection of faith and technology in your life with the helpful input of several leading thinkers in this field. We will explore these topics from a variety of perspectives over two days – Friday, November 2 and Saturday, November 3.

On Friday, November 2 from 7:00-9:00 pm, we will have a screening of the documentary Screenagers followed by a panel discussion and Q & A. All are welcome to attend the screening, whether you are a caretaker of teenagers or not! Middle and high school students are encouraged to attend as well!

Saturday morning, we will gather at Restoration from 8 am – 12 pm to listen to speaker and technology expert, John Dyer of Dallas Theological Seminary and then we will have an opportunity for participants to attend two breakout sessions on topics of their choosing. More information on John Dyer, the leaders of our breakout sessions, as well as the breakout session topics can be found on the registration form.

Please feel free to join for one, or both days! It’s sure to be a wonderful time to stop, reflect, and then re-engage in a more thoughtful and informed way!

SPEAKER BIOS

John Dyer  (Main Speaker)

  • John Dyer is the Dean of Enrollment Services and Educational Technology and Adjunct Professor of Media Arts and Worship at Dallas Theological Seminary. John has been a technology creator for more than 20 years, building tools used by Facebook, Google, Apple, Anheuser-Busch, the Department of Defense, and the Digital Bible Society. His open source code is now used on more than 30% of websites. He has written on technology and faith for a number of publications including Gizmodo, Christianity Today, The Gospel Coalition, and in the book From the Garden to the City: The Redeeming and Corrupting Power of Technology. John and his wife, Amber, have two children, Benjamin and Rebecca.

Justin Whitmel Earley

  • Justin Whitmel Earley is the founder of The Common Rule and author of The Common Rule: Habits of Purpose for an Age of Distraction. He will be sharing his wisdom surrounding the power of purposeful habits in helping us to stay engaged and present with those we love. He and his wife, Lauren, have three boys and live in Richmond, Virginia.

J.R. 

  • J.R. has spent the past twenty years working with Artificial Intelligence (AI) technology in a variety of forms: the video game industry, transportation systems, academia, startups, and Silicon Valley industrial research labs.  He will be exploring how the human brain works and why we make the choices we do online. He will also offer some thoughts on how we can be better “Digital Citizens of Heaven.”

“Screenagers” Movie

  • “Screenagers” is an award-winning film that probes into the vulnerable corners of family life and depicts messy struggles over social media, video games and academics.  The film offers solutions on how we can help our teenagers navigate the digital world.APEX will also be hosting a panel discussion with technology specialist and Dallas Theological Seminary professor John Dyer, immediately following the screening.

Click the link below to REGISTER.

REGISTER

 

Fall Retreat 2018

Twenty years ago this fall, I first learned the value of retreats. There is no place better than a retreat for quickly building strong relationships.

As a first-year student at UVA, I was trying to find connections to Christian community. I went a few times to a fellowship group called FCA.  Everyone was friendly enough, but each week, I would slip out of the large group meeting not knowing many people.

A few weeks into the school year, they started advertising the Fall Retreat. “Come to the retreat! You won’t regret it,” was the refrain from many upperclassmen.

No way, I thought. I barely know anyone. Why would I want to repeat the same uncomfortable experience over an entire weekend? I didn’t sign up.

On the Friday of the retreat weekend, I went out with friends and returned to my dorm room at 2 am to an enthusiastic voicemail from an older FCA student named Brad, who is one of my best friends to this day: “Daniel, you’re coming on this retreat! Tomorrow at 9, a girl named Katye is going to be outside your dorm to pick you up – get yourself up, you’re coming!”

Feeling no choice, I dragged myself out of bed the next morning and hopped a ride with Katye up to Camp Varsity in rural Virginia.

The retreat speaker was a former student named Brian Broadway.  I don’t remember much about what he taught that weekend.  What I do remember is playing hours of ultimate frisbee – getting into a ridiculously fun food fight – playing guitars around campfires – feeling close to God amidst the beauty of nature. Most of all, I remember good conversations with people I found myself really liking – many of whom remain friends to this day.

To my surprise, going on the retreat drew me into FCA. It became a home for the rest of my college experience and was pivotal in fostering my community and spiritual growth at UVA. Looking back, I’m so glad that Brad dragged me up there.

There is no place better than a retreat for quickly building strong relationships.

Fast forward to our first year at Restoration. Campbell and I were just trying to keep our heads above water with a super demanding job and more demanding young kids. Life felt really hard. I knew a few people at Restoration but wasn’t sure if it was worth it to give up a whole weekend for the fall retreat.

As soon as we got up to Massanetta Springs, I was reminded of how much I love retreats. I loved watching our girls dancing to Matt and Clay playing bluegrass music. I was able to take a breath and appreciate God’s goodness amidst the crazy. I struck up conversations with people who have become good friends – conversations that just aren’t possible when you only have a few minutes after church, trying to prevent a little one from running into Quincy Street! That retreat solidified our connection to Restoration.

You may find yourself on the fence about coming on this retreat. Perhaps you’re reticent to spend a whole weekend with people you may not know very well. Or maybe you’re unsure of whether it’s worth it to give up a whole weekend away when life is crazy busy.

I promise not to send someone to pick you up without your consent. But I do feel confident repeating the same truthful refrain that I first heard 20 years ago:

Come to the retreat!!  You won’t regret it.

– Dan Vogel

SIGN UP for the Fall Retreat!

Rule of Life

On Tuesday, July 31 from 6:30-8:30pm in the sanctuary at Restoration, I’ll be leading a mini-workshop on how to create a personal rule of life.

A Rule of Life is a tool rooted in the monastic tradition and it used take inventory of all aspects of our life, to create intentional goals, and to measure our progress toward our God-given callings, goals, and responsibilities.

The idea started by a monk named Benedict to help create order and stability for the monks in his monastery. He wasn’t the first to try such a thing, but he was the first to create a rule of life that was actually livable. So despite it being strict, it was helpful because it led to flourishing and growth for those in his monasteries. And there are still Benedictine monks to this day living by his rule for life.

If you feel like your life is overwhelmingly busy. Or if you are in a season of questioning and discerning your calling, especially as it relates to work. Or if you feel like you are doing things you don’t want to do and never getting to the things you actually want to do. Or if you feel like you have been in a spiritual rut and not growing, it can be helpful to press pause, take stock of where you are going and what you are doing in order to see if it is taking you where God wants you to go. Creating a personal rule of life is a helpful tool to do that.

It is just a tool, and it certainly isn’t the only thing you can do. You can go for a walk, call a friend, pray, lift weights, take a deep breath, journal. But some of these things might be habits you want to regularly incorporate into your daily schedule and rhythms. A rule of life will help you find a place for them in your already packed schedule… 🙂

That’s the gist.

We’ll spend a bit of time talking about what a rule of life is and how to put one together for yourself.

I should note I learned about all of this from a good friend and mentor named Steve Macchia who wrote the book on creating a personal rule of life. I’ll be using it to structure our time together. Feel free to buy a copy for yourself if you want to go deeper. It is very well done!

I hope you will consider coming next Tuesday, July 31st. Bring a journal or notepad.

If you have questions or want to let me know you are coming, email me. Thanks!

– Scott

Summer Small Group Thursdays 7:30-9pm at Restoration Starting July 12

Some of us love what we do. Others are deeply dissatisfied. A lot of us get burnt out by our
work, and others find our jobs boring. Some experience both at the same time! And it seems
nearly all of us struggle to figure out how to manage the responsibilities and demands of our
work, our families, and our sanity.

Our assessment of our work performance is often one of the best gauges to assess our
emotions. Our work affects us. It is often our go-to when someone asks us how we are doing.

Friend 1: How are things going?

Friend 2: Good, work is going well. Our firm just brought on a new client. How are things with you?

Friend 1: I’m stressed. Work is insane right now.

You get the idea…

Starting July 8, we’ll begin a summer sermon series on work and why it matters. And though
small groups are taking a break for the summer, we’re offering one special 6-week small group
that will run concurrently with the sermon series.

The group will meet on Thursday evenings from 7:30-9pm at Restoration. Sign up.

We’ll follow the passages used in the prior sermon, and we’ll follow the book “Work Matters” by Tom Nelson. You certainly don’t need to read the book to participate (It’s summer after all!).

So whether you work full-time (as a parent and/or in an office!) or part-time, whether you are
looking for a job, or want to get rid of the one you got, and whether you’re a student, retired,
or something else, I hope you will consider joining us. Our vocations take a variety of forms, and we all have wisdom and experience to share. Plus there’s going to be snacks!

Additionally, if you are new to Restoration or just moved here this summer, please come! Small groups are one of the best ways to get connected here.

Work is hard. But it matters. To God. To us. And to each other.

Join us!

– Scott

Resto Summer BBQ

Summer is here! And that means it is time for the Restoration Summer BBQ!

Join us at Oak Grove Park* (1606 N Quincy St. – across from where we park on Sundays!) after the 5 pm service on Sunday, July 15!

If you are looking to have maximum fun this summer, this is the BBQ for you. It will have everything: hot dogs, burgers, veggie burgers, lemonade, ice tea, water, music, outdoor games, a playground, fun people like you… I could go on, but let me get to the important details:

Sign up your favorite dessert (if your last name is A-G) or favorite side (if your last name is H-Z)!

We would also love your help with set up, grilling, or clean up! Sign up here!

Everyone is welcome! Bring your friends (and maybe a lawn chair or a blanket)! Can’t wait to see you there!

*If it rains, we’ll meet in Fellowship Hall!

Oak Grove Park

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