Fall Retreat 2018

Twenty years ago this fall, I first learned the value of retreats. There is no place better than a retreat for quickly building strong relationships.

As a first-year student at UVA, I was trying to find connections to Christian community. I went a few times to a fellowship group called FCA.  Everyone was friendly enough, but each week, I would slip out of the large group meeting not knowing many people.

A few weeks into the school year, they started advertising the Fall Retreat. “Come to the retreat! You won’t regret it,” was the refrain from many upperclassmen.

No way, I thought. I barely know anyone. Why would I want to repeat the same uncomfortable experience over an entire weekend? I didn’t sign up.

On the Friday of the retreat weekend, I went out with friends and returned to my dorm room at 2 am to an enthusiastic voicemail from an older FCA student named Brad, who is one of my best friends to this day: “Daniel, you’re coming on this retreat! Tomorrow at 9, a girl named Katye is going to be outside your dorm to pick you up – get yourself up, you’re coming!”

Feeling no choice, I dragged myself out of bed the next morning and hopped a ride with Katye up to Camp Varsity in rural Virginia.

The retreat speaker was a former student named Brian Broadway.  I don’t remember much about what he taught that weekend.  What I do remember is playing hours of ultimate frisbee – getting into a ridiculously fun food fight – playing guitars around campfires – feeling close to God amidst the beauty of nature. Most of all, I remember good conversations with people I found myself really liking – many of whom remain friends to this day.

To my surprise, going on the retreat drew me into FCA. It became a home for the rest of my college experience and was pivotal in fostering my community and spiritual growth at UVA. Looking back, I’m so glad that Brad dragged me up there.

There is no place better than a retreat for quickly building strong relationships.

Fast forward to our first year at Restoration. Campbell and I were just trying to keep our heads above water with a super demanding job and more demanding young kids. Life felt really hard. I knew a few people at Restoration but wasn’t sure if it was worth it to give up a whole weekend for the fall retreat.

As soon as we got up to Massanetta Springs, I was reminded of how much I love retreats. I loved watching our girls dancing to Matt and Clay playing bluegrass music. I was able to take a breath and appreciate God’s goodness amidst the crazy. I struck up conversations with people who have become good friends – conversations that just aren’t possible when you only have a few minutes after church, trying to prevent a little one from running into Quincy Street! That retreat solidified our connection to Restoration.

You may find yourself on the fence about coming on this retreat. Perhaps you’re reticent to spend a whole weekend with people you may not know very well. Or maybe you’re unsure of whether it’s worth it to give up a whole weekend away when life is crazy busy.

I promise not to send someone to pick you up without your consent. But I do feel confident repeating the same truthful refrain that I first heard 20 years ago:

Come to the retreat!!  You won’t regret it.

– Dan Vogel

SIGN UP for the Fall Retreat!

Rule of Life

On Tuesday, July 31 from 6:30-8:30pm in the sanctuary at Restoration, I’ll be leading a mini-workshop on how to create a personal rule of life.

A Rule of Life is a tool rooted in the monastic tradition and it used take inventory of all aspects of our life, to create intentional goals, and to measure our progress toward our God-given callings, goals, and responsibilities.

The idea started by a monk named Benedict to help create order and stability for the monks in his monastery. He wasn’t the first to try such a thing, but he was the first to create a rule of life that was actually livable. So despite it being strict, it was helpful because it led to flourishing and growth for those in his monasteries. And there are still Benedictine monks to this day living by his rule for life.

If you feel like your life is overwhelmingly busy. Or if you are in a season of questioning and discerning your calling, especially as it relates to work. Or if you feel like you are doing things you don’t want to do and never getting to the things you actually want to do. Or if you feel like you have been in a spiritual rut and not growing, it can be helpful to press pause, take stock of where you are going and what you are doing in order to see if it is taking you where God wants you to go. Creating a personal rule of life is a helpful tool to do that.

It is just a tool, and it certainly isn’t the only thing you can do. You can go for a walk, call a friend, pray, lift weights, take a deep breath, journal. But some of these things might be habits you want to regularly incorporate into your daily schedule and rhythms. A rule of life will help you find a place for them in your already packed schedule… 🙂

That’s the gist.

We’ll spend a bit of time talking about what a rule of life is and how to put one together for yourself.

I should note I learned about all of this from a good friend and mentor named Steve Macchia who wrote the book on creating a personal rule of life. I’ll be using it to structure our time together. Feel free to buy a copy for yourself if you want to go deeper. It is very well done!

I hope you will consider coming next Tuesday, July 31st. Bring a journal or notepad.

If you have questions or want to let me know you are coming, email me. Thanks!

– Scott

Resto Summer BBQ

Summer is here! And that means it is time for the Restoration Summer BBQ!

Join us at Oak Grove Park* (1606 N Quincy St. – across from where we park on Sundays!) after the 5 pm service on Sunday, July 15!

If you are looking to have maximum fun this summer, this is the BBQ for you. It will have everything: hot dogs, burgers, veggie burgers, lemonade, ice tea, water, music, outdoor games, a playground, fun people like you… I could go on, but let me get to the important details:

Sign up your favorite dessert (if your last name is A-G) or favorite side (if your last name is H-Z)!

We would also love your help with set up, grilling, or clean up! Sign up here!

Everyone is welcome! Bring your friends (and maybe a lawn chair or a blanket)! Can’t wait to see you there!

*If it rains, we’ll meet in Fellowship Hall!

Oak Grove Park

Giving A Little Love

Restoration singing carols at Sunrise Senior Living

The first time I went to Sunrise Senior Living to sing Christmas Carols with the residents, I was a volunteer working with APEX Youth Ministry and had no idea what to expect.  By the time it was over, I was convinced that we needed to do this every year and now that I am the Director of Youth Ministry, we do.

When we think of Restoration’s mission to connect people to God, others and the needs of the world, it is easy to default to the work we do overseas or with our local partnerships with AFAC, Casa Chirilagua and Restoration Immigration Legal Aid (R.I.L.A). It’s easy to get lost in the idea that big acts of service are the ones that are the most impactful. This yearly trip to Sunrise showed me, first hand, that small acts of service can carry just as much of an effect.

As the mantra of our Kids’ ministry exclaims, everyone wants to know that they are loved, known and seen by God.  It doesn’t take much to remind them of that.  Sometimes it’s a wink, a hand on the shoulder in solidarity, or an entire congregation of your neighboring church coming over and singing exuberantly at the top of their lungs with Santa and elf hats galore.

We invite you to join us again this year after the 5pm service, to take 30 minutes to spread some Christmas cheer to residents who can be easily forgotten.  Help us to remind them again this season that they are not.

Where:  Sunrise Senior Living
2000 N Glebe Rd, Arlington, VA 22207

When:  This Sunday, December 17th (6:30pm – 7:15pm) –
Immediately following the 5pm service.

Hope to see you there,

Isaiah Brooms
Director of Youth Ministry

 

 

 

Fall Retreat: Line Dancing, Wine Tasting, Lawn Games and More

Spots are filling up fast for this year’s annual fall retreat, but there is still time to make memories with us. Taking place in beautiful Massanetta Springs Camp and Conference Center in Harrisonburg, VA (about a 2.5 hour ride from the Washington, D.C. area), the retreat is a terrific opportunity to escape the Beltway for a few days to worship, pray and fellowship with our church family.

bonfire

Additionally, this year’s featured speaker will be Joe Ho of Focused Ministries who has prepared an important topic for us to discuss and think about titled: “The Problem of Race and The Power of The Cross.” Click here for more details.

wine

And if that wasn’t enough, the Fall Retreat will also feature a number of fun-filled activities including:

  • Lavender Farm (includes wine tasting)
  • Yoga
  • Farm visit
  • Bonfire
  • Soccer
  • Lawn Games
  • Boat making
  • Fishing
  • RestoArts

And last but not least…. Line Dancing!

What are you waiting for? Sign up now to secure your spot to join in on the fun!

Financial aid to cover a portion of the expenses is available through the registration form. Our kids (nursery – 5thgrade) will be in their kids’ small groups during the adult sessions. APEX (grades 6-12) will also be meeting during the adult sessions.

Restoration Fall Retreat: Let’s Make Memories Together

Fall is upon us and that means that the Restoration Anglican Church Fall Retreat is right around the corner. To those who have been there before, here’s your chance to do it all over again. And for those who have never been, here are just a handful of reasons why you should sign up – and make memories with us.

It’s Fun!

Located in picturesque Massanetta Springs Camp and Conference Center, there is no shortage of games and activities for you and your family. From traditional board games, to outdoor games including – basketball, soccer and football – chances are that any given time there is someone doing something fun at the conference center. Among the highlights include a chance to play soccer with a large group. All ages are welcomed to kick the soccer ball around.

It’s Beautiful!

Comfortably, but conveniently, removed from the hustle and bustle of the Washington, D.C. area, Harrisonburg is beautiful, especially during the fall. The resort provides many inviting trails for one to collect their thoughts and pray without the distractions of city life. The retreat is a great opportunity to enjoy God’s creation.

There’s a Bonfire!

Always a fan favorite, the bonfire is a chance for folks to gather around the fire roasting marsh mellows, singing hymns and enjoying one another’s company. Don’t be surprised if people linger around the fire long after the littlest ones turn in. Camp memories are incomplete without bonfires and at the Resto Fall retreat, we don’t disappoint.

Come For the Fun, Stay for the Guest Speaker

Year in, year out, the staff do a great job recruiting great speakers to join us at our retreat. The theme may differ from year to year, but the message is always convicting and powerful. For this year, our guest speaker is Joe Ho – the National Director of Asian American Ministries at InverVarsity Christian Fellowship. Joe is a gifted speaker who loves the Lord and is traveling from Austin, TX to join us for our church retreat.

What Are You Waiting For? Sign Up Now!

Stay tuned for more posts about the Fall Retreat and encourage others to sign up today.

Note: Our kids (nursery-5th grade) will be in their kids’ small groups during the adult sessions. APEX (grades 6-12) will also be meeting during the adult sessions.

Financial aid to cover all or a portion of the expenses is available upon request. Please contact a staff member for further details.

Explore God

You are here because you have questions.

Perhaps someone invited you to consider something new.  Perhaps you have wanted to settle what you think and feel about ‘God’.  Perhaps something has happened in your life that surprised you.  Perhaps a situation has emerged for which you aren’t prepared.

All of us have something that keeps us up at night or makes us wonder or makes us scared.

We’re all asking questions.

For 8 weeks, the folks at Restoration are wrestling through some of our biggest questions and we hope that you will join us in the conversation.  We know you have something to offer.  We would like to listen.

We would like to Explore God with you.

The questions

If you show up on a Sunday, one of our pastors will offer a 25 minute reflection on how peoples and cultures have engaged the particular question for that week.  As you listen, you might find that you agree or that what they are saying makes you mad or that you hadn’t considered that idea before.  That’s what humble exploration does.

Here are the questions we will be asking:

  1. Does life have a purpose?  (Easter, April 16)
  2. Is there a God?  (April 23)
  3. Why does God allow pain and suffering?  (April 30)
  4. Is Christianity too narrow?  (May 7)
  5. Is Jesus really God?  (May 14)
  6. Is the Bible reliable?  (May 21)
  7. Can I know God personally?  (May 28)
  8. How can I be filled with the Holy Spirit?  (June 4)

Did you miss what we talked about on Sunday?  Do you want to hear it again?  We post the audio of each message about 24 hours after it is given right here.  So feel free to catch up or listen again.  Some of these topics require a longer time to process and digest.

The Conversations

The people around you at Restoration are engaging in the question, too, and would love to hear how you might answer.  If you are interested, they would probably tell you their story too.

During the spring, we have chosen a half dozen public places around the Metro DC area to host a weekly gathering of people who are discussing that week’s question.  It’s a place where you can drop in to hear what others are saying and to offer your own take.  Imagine a comfortable space in a local restaurant or park with food and beverages and intentional opportunities to follow up on the questions we are asking.  We are hoping that the locations and times will fit naturally after work as you head home or in the evening or on a weekend.  Everybody likes a good meal and good conversation. 

The Locations

Sunday (1pm) – Rocklands BBQ, 3471 Washington Blvd, Arlington, VA
Contact: Matt Hoppe – matt@restorationarlington.org
Monday  (7:30pm) – Lost Dog Cafe, 2920 Columbia Pike, Arlington, VA
Contact: Eva-Elizabeth Chisholm – eva.chisholm@gmail.com 
Tuesday (5:30pm) – LePain Quotidien, 800 17th St. NW, Washington D.C.
Contact: Brendan Sorem (703)927-1839

Tuesday (7:30pm) – Los Tios, 2615 Mt. Vernon Ave, Alexandria, VA
Contact: Mike and Jen Dodson – mike.jen.dodson@gmail.com 
Wednesday (7:30pm) – Restoration Anglican Church, 1815 N. Quincy St, Arlington, VA
Contact: Isaiah Brooms – isaiah@restorationarlington.org

Going a bit deeper

As you can see from the video at the top of this page, lots of people are asking these questions.  If you want to do some exploring on your own, we highly recommend this library of readings and videos.  They are short (which is nice) and it is easy to search for a particular topic.  So feel free to poke around as you think about your own convictions and choices.

At Restoration, we are all asking questions.  If you want to ask one of us something in particular, feel free to shoot us a note.

Hope you have a great day and hope we get to meet you this spring as we explore God together.

David Hanke

Come to the Cross: An invitation and a story

Written by Steve Brooks

This is a personal invitation for you to come to the cross, both literally and spiritually. On Good Friday at 8:45 a.m. Restoration Anglican Church will do something new – we will have a “Procession of the Cross” from our house to the church. (See details below.) It is a one-mile journey that I have dreamed of for years and everyone is invited to participate.

Here is a little context and history as to what we are doing and why. Over the course of Restoration’s history, I have built five crosses for the church. Three of these crosses are currently used by Restoration full-time, one stands in my backyard (which we use on Good Friday) and the last one was retired a few years ago. I have a passion for making crosses. David and Matt have been very kind to let me apply my passion through cross making for our church.

CrossforGoodFriday

With that said, we need to get the Easter cross to church. And why not do this in a way that bestows the reverence the cross deserves and process with it in remembrance of how Jesus was forced to carry the cross on which he died so that our sins would be forgiven.

The procession will take about 45 minutes, and once we arrive at the church, we will lay the cross down in the sanctuary and everyone will be invited to nail your sins to the cross. There will be paper, pens, hammers and nails provided.

Prior to the service on Friday night the cross will be raised up with all the sins upon it and then at the end of the service the cross is removed in silence. On Saturday night, the cross is set up outside of the church and we remove the sins and burn them in the fire-pit before we enter for the Easter Vigil service. It is amazing.

So please – come to the cross.

I also invite you to come to another cross: the big one at the front of the sanctuary. Most people don’t make it past the communion rail, so please accept this invitation, too. This cross arrived last Easter and was a year behind schedule. When I first started building it for Easter 2015, a worktable collapsed and broke one of my knuckles. It took some time for my hand to heal before I could begin work again. It was a spiritual journey working on this cross, and I am grateful for how God worked through and in me in so many ways: That’s a whole other blog post.

As you come to the cross I invite you to touch it. The vertical section is made from 60-year-old Canadian red pine that came from a house renovation and the cross piece is a red oak beam that supported a tobacco barn in Richmond, Virginia that was built in 1910. Although they are different woods, the “red wood” was chosen specifically to represent the blood of Christ.

On both sides of the vertical section you will see 57 holes that have been filled with oak dowels – these filled holes represent our sins that have been forgiven. On the front of the vertical piece you will see two in-laid oak lines and one open cut that go from the top to the bottom of the cross. The oak in-lay comes from the original wooden cross that now hangs in the rafters at the back of the church. Have you noticed it? The in-lay represents the beauty of our forgiven sins, and the open cut in the middle represents the brokenness of humanity which will last until Christ returns and restores us fully.

The giant crack in the oak cross piece is faced forward for all to see as it represents the humanity of Christ and the brokenness he endured on Good Friday. When I saw it for the first time I knew it had to be the cross piece. Oak is one of the hardest woods and I find it amazing that it cracked as it did, what stress it must have been under. As I shaped this piece of wood I was reminded over and over again that God sent His only Son to live, be broken and die for our forgiveness.

I also invite you to come to another cross, the one that hangs in the rafters at the back of the church. This cross was hung in the sanctuary from 2010-2016 and moved last year. Although you can’t see the details of this cross (but check out the picture), it is a beautiful red oak beam from a Pennsylvania barn that was built in 1830. It is unique in so many ways with a history that is unknown. It hangs in the rafters as a representation that when we leave church every Sunday, we leave with the cross of Christ.

Finally, you are invited to visit the small processional cross that stands in the front right corner of the sanctuary – we used this cross at Restoration’s first service. It became the processional cross to lead the kids to their small groups and is now used at various times throughout the year. The red oak is from Home Depot, not much of a story there. The cross stand is made of leftover brick and Canadian red pine which were used to build our church.

Working with wood is more than a labor of love for me, it is a true blessing, especially in making a cross. While working, I play loud music, talk to God, pray and listen for His response. In these times of quiet I think about who I am, why I am here and I always ask God, “What do You want me to do next?” In these moments of “making,” I think about how God restores us in all things. His restoration goes beyond a few cuts here and there, some sanding, then oil and a final finish. His restoration brings us back to life. I can’t do that with an old barn beam, but He does it with us – it’s His promise.

My last invitation is for you to come to the cross and find Christ in a new way, find His restoration and know that no matter what, He loves you.

If you want to participate in the “Procession of the Cross” – send me an email and I will give you our address. brooks{at}potomacassociates.com.

Written by Steve Brooks

Last Chance to Register for #RestoRetreat2016!

Where can you find Geocaching, hiking, lawn games and a vineyard all in one place? If you answered the Restoration Retreat, you’d be right!

(09) Fall Leaves

There are only a few spots remaining and the October 2 deadline to sign up is fast approaching. If you act now, you can secure your spot to join in on the fun.

This year’s retreat promises to be the best one yet. We are expecting a large group from church to make their way out to Massanetta Springs Camp and Conference Center, located near Harrisonburg, VA (around 2.5 hours from Restoration). Among the highlights to look forward to is a chance to try out square dancing! Don’t worry non-dancers: there will be plenty of activities that don’t require dancing available during the weekend as well.

And for families on the fence: nursery and activities for the children are available, including boat making at the creek and soccer at the field.

Fall Retreat 2

#RestoRetreat2016 is a chance to unplug from the stress of the Beltway and join with our church community for fun and fellowship. Folks that have attended before know that this is a unique opportunity to truly get to know other members of our church and connect with one another in new ways.

Consider attending this year’s retreat to join in on a fun-filled and spiritually fulfilling weekend!

P.S. Please do not let the cost of the retreat dissuade you from signing up. Scholarships are available to cover the cost for those seeking financial assistance.

Fall Retreat Weekend Hike #RestoRetreat2016

There are many opportunities for fellowship at the upcoming Fall Retreat. Over the past few years, a small group has taken advantage of enjoying other Resto-folk and God’s beautiful nature by taking Friday (October 14) off from work and hiking in the Shenandoah Valley before the official start of the Fall Retreat on Saturday morning. You can be a part of that adventure as well. We would welcome you and hope you will share your story with us along the way.

In reflecting about last year’s retreat, one hiker said that she loved the Friday hike because it gave her the opportunity to hang out with a few people and really get to know them. Hiking makes for very easy chats with people and created a bonding experience.

Fall Retreat2

If you are interested in extending the fall retreat, here are the details you need to know:

Where: Emerald Pond/Bird Knob Hike

This hike has two spectacular views and is an “out and back” hike. This hike has one mile of steep hiking at the beginning and then is more easy and flat.

More info here: https://virginiatrailguide.com/2012/07/24/bird-knob/

When: Leave from Arlington around 7:30 am (Carpooling available from the church)

The drive will take about 2 hours. The group will plan to hike about 2 hours, break for lunch for about an hour, and hike back 2 hours.

The full hike is 8 miles in length, with a shorter, 6-mile option. The hikers may elect to stay together or divide into groups to hike different lengths.

Who: This hike is appropriate for any level or age of hiker. However, parents should consider the length of this hike (6 miles with 1 mile of steeper hiking) for children when planning to hike as a family.

And then: Hikers will travel about 45 minutes to Massanetta Springs (retreat center) stopping for dinner and fellowship along the way in Historic Downtown Harrisonburg. Capital Ale House is a recommended dinner spot from last year’s hikers.

Needed supplies: Pack for carrying water (at least 2 liters), lunch, and snacks to share. Hiking shoes are highly recommended as the path is rocky.

Other note: To let us know you are interested, please be sure your fall retreat registration indicates that you are staying at Massanetta on Friday night.

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